The 10 Best IDW Comic Series, According To Ranker

With the release of Transformers: Rise of the Beasts delayed until 2023, fans of the beloved franchise can turn to IDW Publishing to fill the Autobot-shaped hole in their hearts. Specializing in branded content, IDW publishes comics that are the continuing adventures of some of the most successful film and television franchises.

Whether it’s classic TV shows like X files or radical comic legends like Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, IDW knows exactly which properties make the best ongoing series. With a large number of great books to choose from, users of private soldier took to the site to vote for their absolute favorite IDW books.

ten The Last Unicorn (2010)

The unicorn watches as she is trapped in a cage

Based on the novel of the same name by Peter S. Beagle, The last unicorn was one of IDW’s most ambitious miniseries. The story follows a unicorn who believes she is the last of her kind in the world. Determined to find out what happened to her people, she travels to her magical land to uncover the truth.

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Although the story was originally adapted into a nearly forgotten animated feature, the film omitted many important plot details. The comic had more time to breathe and captured nearly all of the beloved book’s narrative. Outside of the story, the whimsical art style was eye-catching, and the color scheme matched well with Beagle’s original artistic vision for the story.

9 The X Files (2013-2017)

Mulder and Scully look out of a steamy window

X files is no stranger to the comic book medium, but he’s never been treated with more love than when IDW acquired the rights to the series. IDW’s book picks up after the end of the show’s ninth season and was originally set to take place as the show’s 10th and 11th seasons.

Although the show ran for nearly an entire decade, fans couldn’t get enough of Mulder and Scully’s supernatural adventures. The beauty of the IDW comic book series is that it really feels like a continuation of the show, and the art style matched the dark tone of the show. With many spin-offs and short series as well, X files has been a lucrative franchise for IDW.

8 Ragnarök: The Breaking of Helheim (2019-2020)

Norse gods attack from Ragnarok

Not to be confused with Marvel’s Norse God Thor, Walter Simonson Ragnarok: The Breaking of Helheim brings mythology to life with a dark twist. After the battle between the Norse gods, Thor begins to hear whispers that some may still live, and his journey takes him to the underworld known as Helheim.

Unlike the brilliant depiction of Norse mythology in other comics, RagnarokThe story is more like the original fables. Bringing to life the most surreal aspects of the mythos, Simonson’s take on the story fits right into the comic book medium, without betraying the intent of the original mythos.

7 G.I. Joe: Cobra (2009-2013)

Chuckles watches from inside a GI Joe Cobra jail cell

G.I. Joe is a franchise that has made the leap into all forms of media, and G.I. Joe: Cobra gave fans a glimpse into the dark side of their favorite action heroes. The story follows an undercover agent as he infiltrates Cobra with the heartbreaking mission of bringing down the organization from within.

During a series of three mini-series, G.I. Joe: Cobra weaved a fascinating narrative that told all about the evil organization. Seen from many angles, including that of the villains, the scope of the story grows greater and greater with each issue. Cobra is a delight for G.I. Joe fanatics and it brought some of the most powerful villains into the IDW comics universe.

6 G.I. Joe (2008-2018)

Snake Eyes reaches out to the battlefield from GI Joe Comics

While IDW generally specializes in short series and unique pieces, G.I. Joe turned out to be one of their biggest investments in history. The adventures of the “Real American Hero” have been revamped and IDW has created its own continuity that spans several books.

RELATED: The 10 Best GI Joe Comics Stories

Taking the comic to places no cartoon or movie has gone before, G.I. Joe features darker storylines that still capture the franchise’s original feel. With a wide scope in its scenarios, IDW G.I. Joe The universe is similar to extended universes from other comic book publishers like Marvel or DC.

5 Sonic the Hedgehog (2018–present)

Super Sonic on the cover of Archie Comics' Sonic the Hedgehog issue 169.

Making a comic of one of the most beloved video game franchises of all time was an ambitious move by IDW, but with sonic the hedgehog, They succeeded. Set in the same universe as the games, the comics follow Sonic and his friends as they battle against the evil Dr. Robotnik and his plans to take over the world.

Made in the same spirit as the games, the comics came as a pleasant surprise to many die-hard Sonic fans. The visuals are pleasing and the storylines never deviate too much from each other Sonic properties when it comes to tone. One of its strongest elements is that the comics frequently use a large list of Sonic characters from all eras of the games.

4 Usagi Yojimbo (2019–present)

Although IDW often reclaims film, television, and video game properties for its books, Usagi Yojimbo was a rare instance where they revived a comic. The book follows a samurai warrior named Miyamoto Usagi, an anthropomorphic rabbit who travels through the ancient Japanese countryside in search of adventure.

The comic debuted in the 1980s and bounced from publisher to publisher until it was revived by IDW. With a rich story to draw from, IDW’s take on Usagi has been consistent with the spirit of its original indie comic in the past. Being under the IDW umbrella gave the writers a chance to give Usagi several crossovers with the TMNT, and further expand audience awareness of a classic comic book character.

3 Transformers (2005-2018)

Megatron-Transformers-IDW-comics

Similar to their point of view G.I. JoeIDW’s approach to Transformers transformed the characters into a comic universe in their own right. Weaving a long narrative across several different books, the Autobots wage their ongoing battle against the evil Decepticons.

RELATED: The 10 Best Stories From The Transformers Comics

Covering cartoons, toy lines and even feature films, the Transformers the franchise seemed pretty oversaturated by the time IDW took on the comics. However, IDW’s artists and writers proved that the characters were ripe for great comic book stories, and they even expanded the franchise into a full-fledged part of the IDW Extended Universe.

2 Locke & Key (2008-2013)

Generally considered one of the best horror comics of all time, locke and key was one of IDW’s most unique books. The book is set in a world where demons attempted to enter the human dimension, but were forged into special keys, each with their own magical ability.

Weird premise aside, the book was an exciting and terrifying adventure that had one of the most unique take on the supernatural ever put on a comic book page. The Magic Keys gave writers an almost endless palette of possibilities to work with, and one of the most fun parts of the series was learning how magic worked.

1 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (since 2011)

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

With the tubular green ninjas enjoying huge success in comic book and movie media, many fans forget they got their start in the comics. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles follows a group of anthropomorphic turtles who fight crime in New York City while training under their master, Splinter.

Combining the best elements from all turtle eras, TMNT is everything a fan of the franchise could hope for. The book brings back many familiar villains, including Shredder and his Foot Clan, but it also introduces quirky villains that fit well with the franchise’s existing characters. Over the years at IDW, the Turtles have crossed paths with many recognizable characters, including Batman and the Ghostbusters.

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Split image of Hercules and Zeus from Marvel Comics and Thor from Thor: Love and Thunder.


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