Born during the pandemic, MOOSE Physical Therapy provides a family atmosphere for treatment


MOOSE Physical Therapy co-owners Jeremy Calame, left, and Jonathan Hamm started their careers at large physiotherapy companies, but the two wanted to provide a more personal and connected experience for their patients. They started their own small business called MOOSE, which stands for Men’s Health Outpatient Orthopedic & Sportsmed Exercise.

PEORIA – There’s a stuffed moose that’s sitting at the receptionist’s desk in MOOSE physiotherapy in northern Peoria.

The plush animal, about two feet tall, is emblematic of the philosophy Jeremy Calame and Jonathan Hamm want to bring to customers – rather than a corporate feel, rather a more relaxed personal connection that shows customers are treated not as numbers but as a family.

“We want to go the extra mile and not only work with them, but show them that here they are treated like family,” said co-owner Calame who used a pandemic layoff as a way to achieve his. dreams of starting his own clinic But he needed a name.

A stuffed moose runs the front desk, at least temporarily, at MOOSE Physical Therapy, 2000 W. Pioneer Parkway, in Peoria.

A stuffed moose runs the front desk, at least temporarily, at MOOSE Physical Therapy, 2000 W. Pioneer Parkway, in Peoria.

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He returned to his youth when his grandfather nicknamed him “Moose” to make him feel tall compared to his brothers. It was serendipity after that.

“My wife then (thought about) what the moose could represent and we thought ‘men’s health, orthopedics’ and it just fell into place after a few minutes,” he said. he declares.

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MOOSE stands for Men’s Health Outpatient Orthopedic & Sportsmed Exercise and it goes to the heart of what both men want – a place where people can feel comfortable, get treated and feel better.

“We want to see patients one by one and try to bond with them. We not only want to treat what is wrong, but also make them feel better and improve their lives,” Hamm said.

MOOSE physiotherapy occupies an unassuming little place at 2000 W. Pioneer Parkway in Peoria.

MOOSE physiotherapy occupies an unassuming little place at 2000 W. Pioneer Parkway in Peoria.

Both men came from big physiotherapy companies, but wanted something smaller. MOOSE is located in an office building near the intersection of Pioneer Parkway and University Street.

Customers are treated for as long as the visit is to last. Both men say it differs from other clinics where a visit is set for a certain time. It’s the “intangible” moose, says Hamm, that he and his partner bring to the treatment table.

And they hope that will result in more referrals due to happier customers.

“We are very patient-oriented. We want to do the treatments without worrying about finances,” Calame said.

Both work on standard physiotherapy issues like orthopedics, shoulders, hips, and joints, but they can also delve into men’s health issues like pelvic pain and urinary or bowel issues.

Hamm met Calame through a friend and last summer they sat outside at a local restaurant and talked about their take on physical therapy. Both clicked and MOOSE was born in October 2020.

MOOSE Physical Therapy offers a pair of private examination rooms.

MOOSE Physical Therapy offers a pair of private examination rooms.

Starting a physiotherapy clinic in the midst of a pandemic where close personal contact is discouraged was a challenge, but both men said they were able to make it work and even thrive. Their clientele continues to grow and they receive more and more referrals.

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“It’s mostly word of mouth from patients,” Calame said, although they are recommended by doctors whose previous clients have done well with their therapy sessions.

And Calame wants patients to feel free to ask him questions about other doctors. Performing diagnostics is outside of their scope of practice at MOOSE, but they can offer suggestions and ideas on how to treat something.

“A woman came in recently and asked about her husband, who has a male health problem. We referred her to a doctor and he’s doing a lot better now,” he said.

This article originally appeared in the Star Journal: Peoria’s MOOSE physiotherapy clinic thrives after pandemic begins


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